Book Review: Revelation - The Movement of the Akan from Kanaan to Ghana 
February 2011


I accidentally stumbled upon this book while doing a search on google about a very particular aspect of the Akan people. One of the few links that was brought up was a link to parts of the above book shown on google books. After giving Akanba's book a cursory perusal, I decided to buy it  as soon as I could. All of this occurred getting to the end of 2010.

The book Revelation - The Movement of the Akan from Kanaan to Ghana was first published in 2010 but according to what the author of the book said on Amazon.com, he has been doing research on this particular topic since the 1990's. It seems to me that as of the present moment (February 2011) this book is not very well known. After all it was published only a year ago. It is however a book that could be of interest to those seeking to research the ancient history and other aspects of the Akan people.

What you will get when you purchase this book is 504 pages of small print (11 or 12 font size) on A4 paper! There is a lot of information in the book -- very interesting photos too. It is full of Akan Adinkra symbols with their corresponding explanations and full of Akan proverbs. For its linguistic value alone, it is worth the price.

I remember having to all the way to New York's Schomburg library this past August 2010 to read Nana Banchie Darkwa's book The Africans who wrote the Bible. This book is now very costly (as of this writing). Who knows, maybe Akanba's book will end up like that in a few years, so if you want to buy it at a reasonable price while the book is still in circulation, now may be the time to buy it. I have already received my copy. Let me point out that I do not know the author of this book, this is not a promotional for him. I found this book and thought it could be a worthwhile book to have for those interested in this kind of information.

In my view, this is the next major work in print about the Akan people (from a secular as well as from an esoteric point of view) since J. B. Danquah's book The Akan Doctrine of God, which was published in 1968. Nana Banchie Darkwah's book is great but Akanba's book covers greater scope in great detail. Akanba is a real "Ghana man" in his tone and passion, championing the cause of the Akan people. Akanba however seems to make no reference to Nana Banchie Darkwa's book nor does he make any reference to The Akan Book and Website in his work (although by looking through his book I can say that it is most likely that he is at least aware of The Akan Book and Website). My only conclusion is that Akanba perhaps decided to have his work stand apart, which is a choice that has to be respected. This major work on the Akan is an attempt at shedding light on an issue whose time has come.

I am now convinced that this info about the Akan and other Afrikans was meant to come out at this time. Before reading Akanba's book, I never knew that there was a prophesy relating to the revelation of this information. All I knew were personal visions and inclinations I received prompting me to write The Akan Book. Akanba's book is like a massively detailed version of aspects of Chapters 3, 4 and 5 of The Akan Book I wrote (especially section 4.10), but not only limited to these, as he covers other areas as well and he obviously writes in a style peculiar to his person. The Akan Book and Website and Akanba's book as well as other works of this nature like Nana Banchie Darkwa's book are all revelations related to the Akan and to other Afrikans. 




Akanba's book

(Photo credit: Amazon.com)